Cloud Foundry Multi-Cloud Options Keep Multiplying: BOSH CPI Support for OpenStack

by April 30, 2012

Cloud Foundry provides a consistent model for deploying and running applications across multiple clouds. This multi-cloud approach preserves developer choice and flexibility, both today and in the future.
Following on the heels of the BOSH hackathon at the recent OpenStack conference, Piston Cloud today announced plans to distribute and support Cloud Foundry on OpenStack, joining existing BOSH support for vSphere and Amazon Web Services. Piston Cloud will offer this new integrated capability in a future release of Piston Enterprise OS and the new project will be submitted to the OpenStack satellite ecosystem for future consideration as an OpenStack incubation project. Details on the announcement are available in the official press release.

Cloud Foundry Multi-Cloud Options Keep Multiplying: BOSH CPI Support for OpenStack

by April 30, 2012

Cloud Foundry provides a consistent model for deploying and running applications across multiple clouds. This multi-cloud approach preserves developer choice and flexibility, both today and in the future.
Following on the heels of the BOSH hackathon at the recent OpenStack conference, Piston Cloud today announced plans to distribute and support Cloud Foundry on OpenStack, joining existing BOSH support for vSphere and Amazon Web Services. Piston Cloud will offer this new integrated capability in a future release of Piston Enterprise OS and the new project will be submitted to the OpenStack satellite ecosystem for future consideration as an OpenStack incubation project. Details on the announcement are available in the official press release.

Cloud Foundry Roadmap: Below the Water Line

by April 27, 2012

Earlier this month we moved to a new open source contribution process for Cloud Foundry.  As part of the new process, we also want to share more information about what code is coming in the future.  This post is the first in what will be a regular series on the Cloud Foundry roadmap.

During the Cloud Foundry Anniversary event we made a point to call out that 80% of our work is really “below the water line”. We are doing a lot of work on the core infrastructure, and only a small fraction of what we do surfaces itself as a visible feature.
For those of you watching the repos, I want to give you a little context on some of the pieces that are sitting around in the code, or are in the process of being added.

Cloud Foundry Roadmap: Below the Water Line

by April 27, 2012

Earlier this month we moved to a new open source contribution process for Cloud Foundry.  As part of the new process, we also want to share more information about what code is coming in the future.  This post is the first in what will be a regular series on the Cloud Foundry roadmap.

During the Cloud Foundry Anniversary event we made a point to call out that 80% of our work is really “below the water line”. We are doing a lot of work on the core infrastructure, and only a small fraction of what we do surfaces itself as a visible feature.
For those of you watching the repos, I want to give you a little context on some of the pieces that are sitting around in the code, or are in the process of being added.

Cloud Foundry Powers Data Sets for Mumbai

by April 26, 2012

This is the third post of a series of guest blogs by application developers. We are featuring a use case by Romin Irani, an individual developer who built APIs for valuable data sets in the City of Mumbai as a public service and hosted them on Cloud Foundry.
Guest blog by Romin Irani, Mind Storm Software
Access to world-class infrastructure coupled with the pay-per-use model has been a dream come true for start-ups and individual developers. For an individual developer and entrepreneur like me, the way I develop and make my applications available for others to use or evaluate has been permanently transformed.
Mumbai Public Data APIs
It has always been difficult for me to get various data sets for the city that I live in, i.e., Mumbai, India.

Cloud Foundry at the OpenStack Design Summit

by April 20, 2012

The Cloud Foundry development team presented Cloud Foundry BOSH at the OpenStack Design Summit on Wednesday in San Francisco, followed by a hackathon focused on adding OpenStack support. BOSH is an open source tool chain for release engineering, deployment and lifecycle management of large-scale distributed services. Cloud Foundry is designed to give customers a choice of clouds, and BOSH supports multiple underlying cloud infrastructure, including vSphere and AWS. BOSH has been used to deploy and manage CloudFoundry.com since its launch and is particularly useful for operating production instances of Cloud Foundry.

Cloud Foundry at the OpenStack Design Summit

by April 20, 2012

The Cloud Foundry development team presented Cloud Foundry BOSH at the OpenStack Design Summit on Wednesday in San Francisco, followed by a hackathon focused on adding OpenStack support. BOSH is an open source tool chain for release engineering, deployment and lifecycle management of large-scale distributed services. Cloud Foundry is designed to give customers a choice of clouds, and BOSH supports multiple underlying cloud infrastructure, including vSphere and AWS. BOSH has been used to deploy and manage CloudFoundry.com since its launch and is particularly useful for operating production instances of Cloud Foundry.

More than 2,000 Developers Attend Cloud Foundry China Open Tour

by April 16, 2012

The first two stops of Cloud Foundry Open Tour at Beijing and Shanghai were huge successes! We had about 1000+ developers show up at each city for this one day event. 10 speakers from across the world delivered 15 high quality and deeply technical sessions to attendees.
Open Tour is not only a developers’ grand gathering to learn about Cloud Foundry, it’s also for partner executives and university professors to share their success story on Cloud Foundry, and online media to live broadcast the event and interview speakers.
Developers in China are extremely passionate about Cloud Foundry: attendees showed up at the venue before 7AM (for a conference that starts at 9AM); people were lining up for registration at 7:30AM. This phenomenon has only happened before at the Apple Store.

The New CloudFoundry.org = Gerrit + Jenkins + GitHub

by April 11, 2012

When we launched Cloud Foundry last year we started with an inefficient open source process based on a complex dual repo structure. The workflow was cumbersome for us to maintain, and at times frustrating for you to consume.
Today we are launching a new OSS contribution process based on a fully integrated Gerrit/Jenkins/GitHub workflow. In this workflow, Cloud Foundry contributors send their commits to a public Gerrit server. When a commit occurs, the Jenkins CI system will run various tests. If the tests succeed, the commit is marked as “Verified”.
The code review system allows developers to discuss and iterate on changes. Anyone can comment and vote +1 or -1 for a change, while committers can vote +2 (i.e. approve a change).