Experimental Clojure Support in Cloud Foundry

by September 25, 2012

We have been working on making it easier to deploy Clojure apps to Cloud Foundry [1]. Clojure is a functional language that runs on the JVM that allows rapid prototyping of applications while offering great support for integration with Java libraries. Many interesting projects–for example, Twitter’s own realtime processing framework Storm–are written in Clojure.
To help to run Clojure apps in Cloud Foundry, we have written a library called claude that you can use to easily access the different services offered by Cloud Foundry, like MongoDB or RabbitMQ.
Now let’s see how you can start deploying your Clojure apps to Cloud Foundry.
Deploying Your Clojure Apps to Cloud Foundry
We assume that you are using leiningen for your Clojure projects.

Experimental Clojure Support in Cloud Foundry

by September 25, 2012

We have been working on making it easier to deploy Clojure apps to Cloud Foundry [1]. Clojure is a functional language that runs on the JVM that allows rapid prototyping of applications while offering great support for integration with Java libraries. Many interesting projects–for example, Twitter’s own realtime processing framework Storm–are written in Clojure.
To help to run Clojure apps in Cloud Foundry, we have written a library called claude that you can use to easily access the different services offered by Cloud Foundry, like MongoDB or RabbitMQ.
Now let’s see how you can start deploying your Clojure apps to Cloud Foundry.
Deploying Your Clojure Apps to Cloud Foundry
We assume that you are using leiningen for your Clojure projects.

Cloud Foundry Visits India

by September 20, 2012

Cloud Foundry Open Tour developer events are designed to help technologists behind the industry’s leading open Platform as a Service to meet and exchange ideas. Last week, we visited India with a huge success–about 1,100 developers attended a series of Cloud Foundry sessions and a hackathon. Developers learned about the open source Cloud Foundry Platform as a Service and how it supports multiple services, frameworks and IaaS layers.
The Cloud Foundry Open Tour is not only a developer event for professional developers; it also attracts students who ended up building some great apps in the hackathon. There were a few professors from technology schools trying to understand how Cloud Foundry fits into the larger cloud ecosystem.

Cloud Foundry Integration for Eclipse Now Supports Standalone Java Applications and Java 7

by September 13, 2012

A new release of Cloud Foundry Integration for Eclipse is available which features the ability to publish standalone Java applications to CloudFoundry.com using either Java 6 or Java 7. Java 7 is also now supported for Grails, Java Web and Spring applications. Standalone applications can only be published to Cloud Foundry instances that support standalone applications such as CloudFoundry.com.
The new integration (version 1.2.0)  allows users to publish standalone Java applications from within Eclipse Indigo JEE or SpringSource Tool Suite (STS) version 2.9.0 or higher.
The previous Cloud Foundry plugin (1.1.0) introduced tunneling support for data services, and further improvements to service tunneling are also available as part of 1.2.0.

How We Built AppFog Using Cloud Foundry

by September 13, 2012

The value proposition of using the cloud is that “things will be easy this way.” Building and operating large scale clouds, however, is rarely easy. As Mark Lucovsky said in his recent interview, “Who said large scale distributed systems are simple?” While solutions like Cloud Foundry make building core cloud technology less daunting, it’s still not easy.
In this guest blog, Lucas Carlson, Founder and CEO of AppFog, illustrates the story of how AppFog was built using Cloud Foundry open PaaS technology and what they learned along the way.
Core Cloud Technology is Hard
Running a simple Cloud Foundry-based service is not very hard. Check out Micro Cloud FoundryTM.
Building one that is suitable for production and enterprise workloads is fairly hard.

How We Built AppFog Using Cloud Foundry

by September 13, 2012

The value proposition of using the cloud is that “things will be easy this way.” Building and operating large scale clouds, however, is rarely easy. As Mark Lucovsky said in his recent interview, “Who said large scale distributed systems are simple?” While solutions like Cloud Foundry make building core cloud technology less daunting, it’s still not easy.
In this guest blog, Lucas Carlson, Founder and CEO of AppFog, illustrates the story of how AppFog was built using Cloud Foundry open PaaS technology and what they learned along the way
Core Cloud Technology is Hard
Running a simple Cloud Foundry-based service is not very hard. Check out Micro Cloud FoundryTM.
Building one that is suitable for production and enterprise workloads is fairly hard.

Build a Real Time Activity Stream on Cloud Foundry with Node.js, Redis and MongoDB 2.0 – Part III

by September 11, 2012

In Part II of this series, we covered the architecture needed for persisting the Activity Streams to MongoDB and fanning it out in real-time to all the clients using Redis PubSub.

Since then, some exciting new Node.js features for Cloud Foundry were launched. In addition, the MongoDB version on Cloud Foundry has been upgraded to 2.0.
In this blog post we will cover how to:

Use Mongoose-Auth to store basic user information, including information from Facebook, Twitter, and Github, and how we made this module with native dependencies work on Cloud Foundry
Use Mongo GridFS and ImageMagick to store user uploaded photos and profile pictures
Perform powerful stream filtering, thanks to new capabilities exposed in MongoDB 2.

Deploying to AWS Using Cloud Foundry BOSH

by September 6, 2012

 

The following information is now out of date. For current information on how to deploy to AWS using Cloud Foundry BOSH, please refer to the documentation at http://docs.cloudfoundry.org/deploying/aws/index.html.

 

Cloud Foundry was designed and built to support distributed applications that can be moved between multiple clouds, including those running on different IaaS infrastructures such as vSphere, vCloud, OpenStack and Amazon Web Services. The key to supporting multiple clouds is BOSH, a cloud deployment and lifecycle management tool that was announced earlier this year.

This blog post will walk you through the steps to start using BOSH on AWS and then show you how to deploy a sample three-tier application.
Read more →

Deploying to AWS Using Cloud Foundry BOSH

by September 6, 2012

Cloud Foundry was designed and built to support distributed applications that can be moved between multiple clouds, including those running on different IaaS infrastructures such as vSphere, vCloud, OpenStack and Amazon Web Services. The key to supporting multiple clouds is BOSH, a cloud deployment and lifecycle management tool that was announced earlier this year.

This blog post will walk you through the steps to start using BOSH on AWS and then show you how to deploy a sample three-tier application. Read more →