Preserving Cloud Application Portability – Introducing Cloud Foundry Core

by November 13, 2012

The Cloud Foundry team is happy to announce Cloud Foundry Core  –  a program designed to preserve cloud application portability.
In the cloud computing world, preserving a choice of clouds is critical. The risks of being locked into a single cloud are substantial. Pricing, reliability, geographic location and compliance can all vary between clouds. Business requirements will evolve over time, necessitating the ability to move between clouds, whether public to private, private to public or between public cloud providers.
Test your Cloud Foundry Core provider
Cloud Foundry Core provides a baseline of common capabilities and an open mechanism to instantly validate application portability.

Cloud Application Portability Made Easy – Introducing Cloud Foundry Core

by

The Cloud Foundry community is happy to announce Cloud Foundry Core  –  a program designed to make cloud application portability easier than ever. Cloud Foundry Core provides a baseline of common capabilities and an open mechanism to instantly validate application portability. Today we announce five Cloud Foundry Core compatible instances. AppFog, Tier 3, Uhuru Software, Micro Cloud Foundry™ and CloudFoundry.com are now Core compatible as part of their commitment to preserving cloud portability.

Test your Cloud Foundry Core provider here.

In the cloud computing world, preserving a choice of clouds is critical. The risks of being locked into a single cloud are substantial. Pricing, reliability, geographic location and compliance can all vary between clouds.

Cloud Application Portability Made Easy – Introducing Cloud Foundry Core

by

The Cloud Foundry community is happy to announce Cloud Foundry Core  –  a program designed to make cloud application portability easier than ever. Cloud Foundry Core provides a baseline of common capabilities and an open mechanism to instantly validate application portability. Today we announce five Cloud Foundry Core compatible instances. AppFog, Tier 3, Uhuru Software, Micro Cloud Foundry™ and CloudFoundry.com are now Core compatible as part of their commitment to preserving cloud portability.
Test your Cloud Foundry Core
provider here.
In the cloud computing world, preserving a choice of clouds is critical. The risks of being locked into a single cloud are substantial. Pricing, reliability, geographic location and compliance can all vary between clouds.

New Release of Micro Cloud Foundry

by November 8, 2012

We are excited to announce a new version of Micro Cloud Foundry™ with a new set of features. Among those new features is a new process to streamline frequent updates so that we can maintain compatibility between Micro Cloud Foundry and any Cloud Foundry-based clouds, including CloudFoundry.com.
If you don’t have a Cloud Foundry
account yet, sign up here.
Micro Cloud Foundry is a complete version of the Cloud Foundry open PaaS, but it runs in a single virtual machine on a developer’s computer. Micro Cloud Foundry exemplifies how a multi-cloud approach to PaaS can help developers easily develop and test their applications locally and deploy to any Cloud Foundry-based clouds with no code or configuration changes.
Download the new Micro Cloud Foundry here.

Password Policy in Cloud Foundry

by November 7, 2012

It’s a well-known fact that most users choose weak passwords. Choosing a strong password is actually much harder than it might seem at first. Huge wordlists constructed from previously leaked password databases are readily availably online and we consistently pick passwords which are at or near the top of those lists.
In a worst-case (but increasingly common) scenario, where the actual database of hashed passwords is stolen, a half-decent cracking program will be able to spit out these weak passwords almost instantly, leading to large numbers of accounts being compromised. This is especially true for simple unsalted password hashes, which companies have been found to be using in some of the recent scandals, despite it being acknowledged as very poor practice for many years.

Password Policy in Cloud Foundry

It’s a well-known fact that most users choose weak passwords. Choosing a strong password is actually much harder than it might seem at first. Huge wordlists constructed from previously leaked password databases are readily availably online and we consistently pick passwords which are at or near the top of those lists.
In a worst-case (but increasingly common) scenario, where the actual database of hashed passwords is stolen, a half-decent cracking program will be able to spit out these weak passwords almost instantly, leading to large numbers of accounts being compromised. This is especially true for simple unsalted password hashes, which companies have been found to be using in some of the recent scandals, despite it being acknowledged as very poor practice for many years.

How to Integrate an Application with Cloud Foundry using OAuth2

by November 5, 2012

This article explains how to use Cloud Foundry APIs from a user
application using the built in identity management solution in
the User Account and Authentication Service (UAA). The UAA
acts (amongst other things) as an OAuth 2.0 Authorization Server,
granting access tokens to Client applications for them to use when
accessing Resource Servers in the platform, such as the Cloud
Controller. This article describes the responsibilities of a Client
application and the mechanics of setting one up. It uses a simple
example Client application (available on
github), and recasts it into
various forms to help developers with different language and tool
preferences to get to grips with the topic (Ruby, Java, Grails).

How to Integrate an Application with Cloud Foundry using OAuth2

This article explains how to use Cloud Foundry APIs from a user application using the built in identity management solution in the User Account and Authentication Service (UAA). The UAA acts (amongst other things) as an OAuth 2.0 Authorization Server, granting access tokens to Client applications for them to use when accessing Resource Servers in the platform, such as the Cloud Controller. This article describes the responsibilities of a Client application and the mechanics of setting one up. It uses a simple example Client application (available on github), and recasts it into various forms to help developers with different language and tool preferences to get to grips with the topic (Ruby, Java, Grails).