IBM WebSphere Liberty Buildpack Contributed to Cloud Foundry

by September 9, 2013

IBM is contributing the IBM WebSphere Liberty Buildpack today as further proof of its commitment to make the Cloud Foundry open source project and community even stronger.
A guest blog by Rachel Reinitz, an IBM Distinguished Engineer in IBM Software Services
In late July, I wrote a guest blog here about our development of a preview IBM WebSphere Liberty buildpack. I’m delighted to announce we have contributed the WebSphere Liberty Buildpack to the Cloud Foundry community. It now has its own Cloud Foundry GitHub repo, ibm-webphere-liberty-buildpack.
Importance of Buildpacks
Buildpacks can provide a complete runtime environment for a specific class of applications. They are key to providing portability across clouds and contributing to an open cloud architecture.

Combining Voice with Velocity thru the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board

by September 8, 2013

Cloud Foundry is taking a unique approach to community that combines inclusiveness and scale with high velocity development. In this post Christopher Ferris, IBM Distinguished Engineer, shares some thoughts on how to bring this approach to life and invites the community to co-invent the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board.
A guest post by Christopher Ferris, an IBM Distinguished Engineer and CTO for Cloud Interoperability in IBM Software Group’s Standards and Open Source organization.
I’m really pleased with the steadily growing interest in Cloud Foundry over the past few months.

Introducing the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack

by September 6, 2013

Buildpacks are at the core of the Cloud Foundry architecture and we’ve recently made significant improvements to the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack. As the lead developer of the buildpack, I’d like to give you some insight into the design principles behind it, how to use, configure, and extend it, and what the future holds.
Design Principles
The primary objective of the Java buildpack is to be the easiest way to run a Java application.1 The word easiest can mean a lot of things, but to me it means that a developer can push an application and have an “it just works™” experience. An application developer shouldn’t have to mess about with details like memory settings or configuring the container to work with a bound service.

A Taste of Platform: 5 Sessions from a Thriving Community

by September 4, 2013

Starting Sunday, September 8th, Platform: the Cloud Foundry Conference welcomes a worldwide group of over 400 dedicated developers and operators to Santa Clara for the first conference around the open source Platform as a Service (PaaS). The conference features leaders, contributors, and users who will cover tech topics, provide roadmaps, and share case studies in an environment designed for interaction and discussion. There is also a dedicated un-conference where attendees attend discussion topics they voted on.
Besides hosts GE, IBM, and Pivotal, companies like VMware, AppFog/Savvis, NTT, Tier 3, ThingWorx, Wipro, Anchora, Rakuten, Cloud Elements, Intel, AnyNines, and others will also be speaking.