Improved Java Tooling for Cloud Foundry

by October 29, 2013

Pivotal has released several new components that enable developers using Java, Groovy, and other JVM languages to deploy applications to Cloud Foundry quickly and easily. This blog post will show the options available to JVM developers with this new tooling.
Maven and Gradle are two popular build tools for Java applications. Maven has been around for many years and enjoys widespread use. Gradle is newer but is gaining mindshare and adoption quickly (Gradle is used to build the core Spring projects and is becoming the recommended build tool for Android applications). Pivotal has released Cloud Foundry plugins for Maven and Gradle that allow developers to deploy and manage applications with the same tools used to build the applications.

Essential Elements of an Enterprise PaaS

by October 24, 2013

When I speak with customer prospects about Cloud Foundry, I don’t start with networks, servers, VMs and build my way up a stack of abstractions, instead I ask them how they will change to compete in an industrial era increasingly defined by software. Refactoring their entire mindset away from IT management to becoming a high performance software factory is job-one of any briefing I give.
Enterprise PaaS delivers a next generation platform to answer this challenge. Leaving the legacy of custom VM, middleware and server orchestration behind can sometimes be uncomfortable for traditional IT buyers, but it is captivating to business oriented leaders looking to transform their organizations.

Canaries are Great!

by October 17, 2013

First a little background, and then a story. As Matt described here, Cloud Foundry BOSH has a great capability to perform rolling updates automatically to an entire set of servers in a cluster, and there is a defensive aspect to this feature called a “canary” that is at the center of this tale. When a whole lot of servers are going to be upgraded, BOSH will first try to upgrade a small number of them (usually 1), the “canary”, and only if that is successful will the remaining servers in the cluster be upgraded. If the canary upgrade succeeds, then BOSH will parallelize up to a “max in flight” number of remaining server upgrades until all are completed.
And now the story.
For the last few weeks I’ve been pairing on the Cloud Foundry development team here at Pivotal.

A Pivotal CF Field Success Story: Installation, User-Provided Services, and Live Capacity Updates

by October 16, 2013

I’ve had the privilege of visiting a few of Pivotal’s early access customers to help them install our Pivotal CF™ PaaS solution, which is powered by Cloud Foundry technology. I’d like to share a recent success story and highlight three benefits from Pivotal CF that were very well received.
This customer, like many we are working with, is in the process of planning a next generation application and data analytics platform focused on PaaS as a strategic centerpiece. We were engaged for a three-day proof of concept (POC) engagement, the focus of which was three-fold:

Install Pivotal CF in a newly created VMware vSphere environment.
Push an application which both ingested and consumed data to/from existing Hadoop and Solr environments.

Monitoring Cloud Foundry Applications with New Relic

by October 10, 2013

A couple of weeks ago, Ben Hale blogged about the new Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack, highlighting some great new features and our design principles – the “it just works” experience.
The new buildpack provides the opportunity for a new level of configuration and setup for popular add-on services, such as application performance and monitoring tools. The Java buildpack now includes automated configuration for the New Relic application monitoring agent. If you create a New Relic service and bind it to an application, the buildpack will set up the New Relic agent automatically when the application is staged.