Using AWS spot instances to cut the cost of your BOSH deployments

by May 22, 2014

AWS, Google and Azure are in a price war; and seem committed to matching on-demand prices. That is good, but not the whole story.
The under reported price is that of the AWS spot market; which can be up to 10 x cheaper than on-demand prices.

Instance Type
On-demand / month
Spot / month

m3.medium
$56
$7

m2.xlarge
$200
$14

r3.xlarge
$358
$29

There are only 2 differences between AWS spot and on-demand instances.
1. Spot instances take longer to start (5 min vs 1 min)
2. Spot instances “fail” more frequently; when spot prices move above your bid price your instance gets terminated.
You might think that ( 2 ) would prevent you from using spot to host “always on” services like Cloud Foundry.
However:
1.

Remote Dependencies, Convenience, Risk and Other Considerations for Operating Distributed Systems

by February 3, 2014

One deeply held principle by experienced distributed system operators that I have worked with is that you should have no external dependencies to your software other than the ties to minimum requirements of the OS such as common system libraries, utilities, and the kernel of the base OS. This approach should enable recreating a distributed system deployment without any dependencies on the outside world. When something goes wrong, you should have control over your own destiny. Reliance on any external dependency that is managed or hosted by someone else introduces risk that something outside your system can affect your ability to restore and recreate the system any time you need to.

Deploying Tomcat 7 Using the Standalone Framework

by June 18, 2012

The new standalone framework support greatly increases the number of different types of non-Web applications that can run on Cloud Foundry, including application servers. This tutorial will walk you through the steps to deploy a “hello world” application in a Tomcat 7 container on Cloud Foundry. Currently, Cloud Foundry leverages Tomcat 6 to host Java web applications. While the team is working to support Tomcat 7 as a first-class container, it is very straightforward to use the standalone application support to run Tomcat 7 in the meantime, which is particularly useful for applications that leverage Servlet 3.0.

Deploying Tomcat 7 Using the Standalone Framework

Editors Note: This post is now outdated and should only be considered eligible to work with Cloud Foundry v1.
The new standalone framework support greatly increases the number of different types of non-Web applications that can run on Cloud Foundry, including application servers. This tutorial will walk you through the steps to deploy a “hello world” application in a Tomcat 7 container on Cloud Foundry. Currently, Cloud Foundry leverages Tomcat 6 to host Java web applications. While the team is working to support Tomcat 7 as a first-class container, it is very straightforward to use the standalone application support to run Tomcat 7 in the meantime, which is particularly useful for applications that leverage Servlet 3.0.

Cloud Foundry Multi-Cloud Options Keep Multiplying: BOSH CPI Support for OpenStack

by April 30, 2012

Cloud Foundry provides a consistent model for deploying and running applications across multiple clouds. This multi-cloud approach preserves developer choice and flexibility, both today and in the future.
Following on the heels of the BOSH hackathon at the recent OpenStack conference, Piston Cloud today announced plans to distribute and support Cloud Foundry on OpenStack, joining existing BOSH support for vSphere and Amazon Web Services. Piston Cloud will offer this new integrated capability in a future release of Piston Enterprise OS and the new project will be submitted to the OpenStack satellite ecosystem for future consideration as an OpenStack incubation project. Details on the announcement are available in the official press release.

Cloud Foundry Multi-Cloud Options Keep Multiplying: BOSH CPI Support for OpenStack

Cloud Foundry provides a consistent model for deploying and running applications across multiple clouds. This multi-cloud approach preserves developer choice and flexibility, both today and in the future.
Following on the heels of the BOSH hackathon at the recent OpenStack conference, Piston Cloud today announced plans to distribute and support Cloud Foundry on OpenStack, joining existing BOSH support for vSphere and Amazon Web Services. Piston Cloud will offer this new integrated capability in a future release of Piston Enterprise OS and the new project will be submitted to the OpenStack satellite ecosystem for future consideration as an OpenStack incubation project. Details on the announcement are available in the official press release.