Cloud Foundry Now Supports Play!

by May 31, 2012

Cloud Foundry now supports Play 2.0 as a first-class framework. Play is a lightweight, stateless, web-friendly framework for Java and Scala. Developers can leverage this event-driven non-blocking IO architecture to build highly scalable applications. Play 1.0 applications were previously deployable to Cloud Foundry as WAR files. Play 2.0, which doesn’t have built-in support for WAR files, can now be deployed to CloudFoundry.com and take advantage of being a fully supported framework that includes auto-reconfiguration, simplified service connections, and automatic database management. Play developers, welcome to Cloud Foundry!
Getting Started with Play 2.

Running Standalone Web Applications on Cloud Foundry

by May 11, 2012

In this final post of the four-part series on deploying standalone apps to Cloud Foundry, we will explore how to build and deploy JVM-based web applications that aren’t packaged as traditional WAR files. This includes applications that are built on top of an NIO Framework like Grizzly or Netty (notable frameworks include Blue Eyes and vert.x) and applications that ship their own container, such as an embedded Jetty server.

Also in this series:

Cloud Foundry Improves Support For Background Processing

Running Resque Workers on Cloud Foundry

Running Workers on Cloud Foundry with Spring

Deploying a Spray Application to Cloud Foundry
Spray is a suite of lightweight Scala libraries for building and consuming RESTful web services on top of Akka.

Running Workers on Cloud Foundry with Spring

by May 9, 2012

In the two previous posts in this series, we discussed using Cloud Foundry’s new support for standalone apps to deploy worker processes. We looked at an example using Resque for Ruby apps. In this third installment, we explore using Spring to create workers in Java apps.

Also in this series:

Cloud Foundry Improves Support For Background Processing

Running Resque Workers on Cloud Foundry

Running Standalone Web Applications on Cloud Foundry

Let’s walk through an example.
Deploying the Cloud Foundry Twitter Search Sample
Cloud Foundry Twitter Search includes two applications: a standalone Java application that periodically polls Twitter for tweets containing the word “cloud” and a Node.

Running Resque Workers on Cloud Foundry

by May 3, 2012

Also in this series:

Cloud Foundry Improves Support For Background Processing

Running Workers on Cloud Foundry with Spring

Running Standalone Web Applications on Cloud Foundry

We introduced Cloud Foundry’s new “standalone” applications feature in the first post in this four-part series. In this second installment, we will look at the most common use of a standalone application–the worker process. Workers can be used for all kinds of asynchronous background jobs, such as updating search indexes, emailing all users with a password reset approaching, performing a database backup to persistent storage, or uploading new customer data from external storage.

Cloud Foundry Improves Support For Background Processing

by May 1, 2012

Cloud Foundry has significantly enhanced support for worker applications that perform background processing by allowing applications to run on CloudFoundry.com without the application container. Cloud Foundry applications are no longer limited to Web applications that respond to HTTP requests. Instead, they can be run as executable or “standalone” applications. A standalone application is one that does not require a provided framework or container.
Many developers create distributed applications that have workers to perform specific functions and communicate via a data or messaging system, such as those developed with Spring Batch, Spring Integration, Resque, or Delayed Job.

Cloud Foundry Now Supports the Rails Console

by February 8, 2012

Ruby and Rails developers can now remotely access the popular rails console using the Cloud Foundry command line tool (VMC). This new feature enables inspection of the Cloud Foundry Runtime App environment, troubleshooting application issues in runtime, and even the ability to modify data “on the fly” for one-off admin tasks.  Using the new vmc rails-console command, developers can target any Cloud Foundry instance, including the upcoming release of Micro Cloud Foundry.
Getting Started
First, install or update your Cloud Foundry command line tool (‘VMC’) to the latest preview version using the following command:
gem install vmc –pre
You can verify that you got the right version using:
vmc -v
which should show the version to be 0.3.16.beta.3 or higher.