Next Generation Cloud Controller: The VMC View

by August 8, 2012

In my last post, I introduced you to some of the new features we are rolling out with the new cloud controller. For reference, I’ve included a block diagram of the new structure to refresh your memory.

In the previous post, the focus was on introducing the objects and briefly discussing how they are used for operational collaboration. In this post, I want to show you how the objects are used for resource accounting, how to navigate around the objects using the Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface (VMC), and then briefly show how features like custom domains use these objects as their foundation.
Resource Accounting
From the diagram above, you can see how the organization (a.k.a., org) object acts as the root object holding a collection of spaces.

Next Generation Cloud Controller: The VMC View

by August 8, 2012

In my last post, I introduced you to some of the new features we are rolling out with the new cloud controller. For reference, I’ve included a block diagram of the new structure to refresh your memory.

In the previous post, the focus was on introducing the objects and briefly discussing how they are used for operational collaboration. In this post, I want to show you how the objects are used for resource accounting, how to navigate around the objects using the Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface (VMC), and then briefly show how features like custom domains use these objects as their foundation.
Resource Accounting
From the diagram above, you can see how the organization (a.k.a., org) object acts as the root object holding a collection of spaces.

Heads Up on Some New Cloud Controller Features

by June 20, 2012

As I discussed in my post at the end of April, the Cloud Controller is undergoing major surgery and this work is being done in the cloud_controller_ng repo. If you are following the review stream for the cloud_controller_ng project, its time to take note of the new Organization and AppSpace objects. These objects are the foundation of several new features we are rolling out this year:

operational collaboration
advanced quota management and control
custom domains and assorted application features

This post will focus on the objects themselves and will discuss operational collaboration to demonstrate their significance. Other features will be discussed in subsequent posts.

Heads Up on Some New Cloud Controller Features

by June 20, 2012

As I discussed in my post at the end of April, the Cloud Controller is undergoing major surgery and this work is being done in the cloud_controller_ng repo. If you are following the review stream for the cloud_controller_ng project, its time to take note of the new Organization and AppSpace objects. These objects are the foundation of several new features we are rolling out this year:

operational collaboration
advanced quota management and control
custom domains and assorted application features

This post will focus on the objects themselves and will discuss operational collaboration to demonstrate their significance. Other features will be discussed in subsequent posts.

Refactoring the VCAP Repo

by May 17, 2012

In my previous post, I talked briefly about the vcap repo refactoring effort. This week, I want to walk you through the process in a little more detail.
If you look closely at the vcap repo, you can see that it’s a collection of major system components (dea, cloud controller, health manager, etc.). This structure is not a scalable structure for the long haul on a number of fronts.
For instance, when building releases we often find ourselves wanting different components at different stages of completion. Within the cf-release repo, we currently have a single sub-module pointer to vcap (src/core). Given the component diversity under vcap, we often find ourselves wanting to be able to manage one launch schedule for each component (e.g.

Refactoring the VCAP Repo

by May 17, 2012

In my previous post, I talked briefly about the vcap repo refactoring effort. This week, I want to walk you through the process in a little more detail.
If you look closely at the vcap repo, you can see that it’s a collection of major system components (dea, cloud controller, health manager, etc.). This structure is not a scalable structure for the long haul on a number of fronts.
For instance, when building releases we often find ourselves wanting different components at different stages of completion. Within the cf-release repo, we currently have a single sub-module pointer to vcap (src/core). Given the component diversity under vcap, we often find ourselves wanting to be able to manage one launch schedule for each component (e.g.

Cloud Foundry Roadmap: Below the Water Line

by April 27, 2012

Earlier this month we moved to a new open source contribution process for Cloud Foundry.  As part of the new process, we also want to share more information about what code is coming in the future.  This post is the first in what will be a regular series on the Cloud Foundry roadmap.

During the Cloud Foundry Anniversary event we made a point to call out that 80% of our work is really “below the water line”. We are doing a lot of work on the core infrastructure, and only a small fraction of what we do surfaces itself as a visible feature.
For those of you watching the repos, I want to give you a little context on some of the pieces that are sitting around in the code, or are in the process of being added.

Cloud Foundry Roadmap: Below the Water Line

by April 27, 2012

Earlier this month we moved to a new open source contribution process for Cloud Foundry.  As part of the new process, we also want to share more information about what code is coming in the future.  This post is the first in what will be a regular series on the Cloud Foundry roadmap.

During the Cloud Foundry Anniversary event we made a point to call out that 80% of our work is really “below the water line”. We are doing a lot of work on the core infrastructure, and only a small fraction of what we do surfaces itself as a visible feature.
For those of you watching the repos, I want to give you a little context on some of the pieces that are sitting around in the code, or are in the process of being added.

The New CloudFoundry.org = Gerrit + Jenkins + GitHub

by April 11, 2012

When we launched Cloud Foundry last year we started with an inefficient open source process based on a complex dual repo structure. The workflow was cumbersome for us to maintain, and at times frustrating for you to consume.
Today we are launching a new OSS contribution process based on a fully integrated Gerrit/Jenkins/GitHub workflow. In this workflow, Cloud Foundry contributors send their commits to a public Gerrit server. When a commit occurs, the Jenkins CI system will run various tests. If the tests succeed, the commit is marked as “Verified”.
The code review system allows developers to discuss and iterate on changes. Anyone can comment and vote +1 or -1 for a change, while committers can vote +2 (i.e. approve a change).

The New CloudFoundry.org = Gerrit + Jenkins + GitHub

by April 11, 2012

When we launched Cloud Foundry last year we started with an inefficient open source process based on a complex dual repo structure. The workflow was cumbersome for us to maintain, and at times frustrating for you to consume.
Today we are launching a new OSS contribution process based on a fully integrated Gerrit/Jenkins/GitHub workflow. In this workflow, Cloud Foundry contributors send their commits to a public Gerrit server. When a commit occurs, the Jenkins CI system will run various tests. If the tests succeed, the commit is marked as “Verified”.
The code review system allows developers to discuss and iterate on changes. Anyone can comment and vote +1 or -1 for a change, while committers can vote +2 (i.e. approve a change).