Announcing Cloud Foundry cf v6

by November 9, 2013

You can find our new Cloud Foundry CLI, written in Go on github.
A complete rewrite, and yes, we changed things
We hadn’t been happy with the Ruby CLI for a while. We had three big problems: it was hard to test drive, it was hard to understand, it was hard to make changes. It was time for a rewrite. We also wanted to stay sensitive to the feedback we had received from the community and incorporate those learnings into the new CLI. This means that the command names changed as did the arguments and output, but retained all the previous functionality for interacting with your cloud and then some.
We decided to aim for a CLI that was easily scriptable so you can use it as part of your deploy scripts.

Improved Java Tooling for Cloud Foundry

by October 29, 2013

Pivotal has released several new components that enable developers using Java, Groovy, and other JVM languages to deploy applications to Cloud Foundry quickly and easily. This blog post will show the options available to JVM developers with this new tooling.
Maven and Gradle are two popular build tools for Java applications. Maven has been around for many years and enjoys widespread use. Gradle is newer but is gaining mindshare and adoption quickly (Gradle is used to build the core Spring projects and is becoming the recommended build tool for Android applications). Pivotal has released Cloud Foundry plugins for Maven and Gradle that allow developers to deploy and manage applications with the same tools used to build the applications.

Essential Elements of an Enterprise PaaS

by October 24, 2013

When I speak with customer prospects about Cloud Foundry, I don’t start with networks, servers, VMs and build my way up a stack of abstractions, instead I ask them how they will change to compete in an industrial era increasingly defined by software. Refactoring their entire mindset away from IT management to becoming a high performance software factory is job-one of any briefing I give.
Enterprise PaaS delivers a next generation platform to answer this challenge. Leaving the legacy of custom VM, middleware and server orchestration behind can sometimes be uncomfortable for traditional IT buyers, but it is captivating to business oriented leaders looking to transform their organizations.

A Pivotal CF Field Success Story: Installation, User-Provided Services, and Live Capacity Updates

by October 16, 2013

I’ve had the privilege of visiting a few of Pivotal’s early access customers to help them install our Pivotal CF™ PaaS solution, which is powered by Cloud Foundry technology. I’d like to share a recent success story and highlight three benefits from Pivotal CF that were very well received.
This customer, like many we are working with, is in the process of planning a next generation application and data analytics platform focused on PaaS as a strategic centerpiece. We were engaged for a three-day proof of concept (POC) engagement, the focus of which was three-fold:

Install Pivotal CF in a newly created VMware vSphere environment.
Push an application which both ingested and consumed data to/from existing Hadoop and Solr environments.

Monitoring Cloud Foundry Applications with New Relic

by October 10, 2013

A couple of weeks ago, Ben Hale blogged about the new Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack, highlighting some great new features and our design principles – the “it just works” experience.
The new buildpack provides the opportunity for a new level of configuration and setup for popular add-on services, such as application performance and monitoring tools. The Java buildpack now includes automated configuration for the New Relic application monitoring agent. If you create a New Relic service and bind it to an application, the buildpack will set up the New Relic agent automatically when the application is staged.

IBM WebSphere Liberty Buildpack Contributed to Cloud Foundry

by September 9, 2013

IBM is contributing the IBM WebSphere Liberty Buildpack today as further proof of its commitment to make the Cloud Foundry open source project and community even stronger.
A guest blog by Rachel Reinitz, an IBM Distinguished Engineer in IBM Software Services
In late July, I wrote a guest blog here about our development of a preview IBM WebSphere Liberty buildpack. I’m delighted to announce we have contributed the WebSphere Liberty Buildpack to the Cloud Foundry community. It now has its own Cloud Foundry GitHub repo, ibm-webphere-liberty-buildpack.
Importance of Buildpacks
Buildpacks can provide a complete runtime environment for a specific class of applications. They are key to providing portability across clouds and contributing to an open cloud architecture.

Combining Voice with Velocity thru the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board

by September 8, 2013

Cloud Foundry is taking a unique approach to community that combines inclusiveness and scale with high velocity development. In this post Christopher Ferris, IBM Distinguished Engineer, shares some thoughts on how to bring this approach to life and invites the community to co-invent the Cloud Foundry Community Advisory Board.
A guest post by Christopher Ferris, an IBM Distinguished Engineer and CTO for Cloud Interoperability in IBM Software Group’s Standards and Open Source organization.
I’m really pleased with the steadily growing interest in Cloud Foundry over the past few months.

Introducing the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack

by September 6, 2013

Buildpacks are at the core of the Cloud Foundry architecture and we’ve recently made significant improvements to the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack. As the lead developer of the buildpack, I’d like to give you some insight into the design principles behind it, how to use, configure, and extend it, and what the future holds.
Design Principles
The primary objective of the Java buildpack is to be the easiest way to run a Java application.1 The word easiest can mean a lot of things, but to me it means that a developer can push an application and have an “it just works™” experience. An application developer shouldn’t have to mess about with details like memory settings or configuring the container to work with a bound service.

A Taste of Platform: 5 Sessions from a Thriving Community

by September 4, 2013

Starting Sunday, September 8th, Platform: the Cloud Foundry Conference welcomes a worldwide group of over 400 dedicated developers and operators to Santa Clara for the first conference around the open source Platform as a Service (PaaS). The conference features leaders, contributors, and users who will cover tech topics, provide roadmaps, and share case studies in an environment designed for interaction and discussion. There is also a dedicated un-conference where attendees attend discussion topics they voted on.
Besides hosts GE, IBM, and Pivotal, companies like VMware, AppFog/Savvis, NTT, Tier 3, ThingWorx, Wipro, Anchora, Rakuten, Cloud Elements, Intel, AnyNines, and others will also be speaking.

Using OpenStack to Take Cloud Foundry into High Gear

by August 23, 2013

In this guest post, Piston Cloud CTO and co-founder Josh McKenty shares why Piston’s OpenStack community infrastructure is a catalyst for growing and expanding the Cloud Foundry community.
By now, most of you have noticed Piston’s growing involvement with Cloud Foundry, and our maturing partnership with Pivotal. It started with our collaboration to support running Cloud Foundry on top of OpenStack, and has matured through a number of joint customers, and more recently, a deepening engagement in Cloud Foundry development itself. So today’s announcement that we have agreed to provide community infrastructure for the CF development ecosystem, should come as no surprise.
Last week, we rapidly deployed a Piston OpenStack environment for the Cloud Foundry community.