cloud foundry

CI/CD Running on Cloud Foundry

by March 24, 2016

Pushing Apps to Cloud Foundry is as easy as it gets, thanks to the cf push command. However, it is still tedious to push your code after every change you make, just to see if it runs in the cloud. That’s where a CI/CD (continuous integration and continuous deployment) server comes in handy. It tests, builds and deploys your code every time you git push changes and makes sure that your code is always tested and deployed.
Now wouldn’t it be nice if your CI/CD server which deploys to Cloud Foundry also actually ran on Cloud Foundry? With Strider that is possible. It watches all your repos and, as soon as you git push some changes, tests them and deploys your app to CF.

Introducing CF-Abacus – Part 3 of 3

by February 19, 2016

picture credit: http://www.tecmaths.com
CF-Abacus team: Jean-Sebastien Delfino (IBM), Saravanakumar Srinivasan “Assk” (Independent), Benjamin Cheng (IBM), Hristo Lliev (SAP), Georgi Sabev (SAP), Kevin Yudhiswara (IBM), Piotr Przybylski (IBM), and Rajkiran Balasubramanian (IBM)
Introduction
In part 1 and part 2 of this series we introduced the metering problem that CF-Abacus solves as well as giving a complete overview of its architecture and design. In the last part we discuss the decisions the team took to realize the architecture and give some hints about future directions and conclude with the next steps. We also provide various references that all parties interested with CF-Abacus can use to become more active in the project.

Introducing CF-Abacus – Part 2 of 3

by February 12, 2016

picture credit: http://www.tecmaths.com
CF-Abacus team: Jean-Sebastien Delfino (IBM), Saravanakumar Srinivasan “Assk” (Independent), Benjamin Cheng (IBM), Hristo Lliev (SAP), Georgi Sabev (SAP), Kevin Yudhiswara (IBM), Piotr Przybylski (IBM), and Rajkiran Balasubramanian (IBM)
Introduction
In part 1 of this 3-part series, we motivated the metering problem for a Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) like CloudFoundry (CF) and introduced and scoped CF-Abacus, which we claim provides a turnkey metering engine that can be used in a scalable manner by any CF installation. In this part, we dive into the architecture of CF-Abacus and also some of the key design points chosen by the team.
Architecture Overview
CF-Abacus uses a pipeline architecture.

Introducing CF-Abacus – Part 1 of 3

by February 4, 2016

picture credit: http://www.tecmaths.com
CF-Abacus team: Jean-Sebastien Delfino (IBM), Saravanakumar Srinivasan “Assk” (Independent), Benjamin Cheng (IBM), Hristo Lliev (SAP), Georgi Sabev (SAP), Kevin Yudhiswara (IBM), Piotr Przybylski (IBM), and Rajkiran Balasubramanian (IBM)
Abstract
Project CF-Abacus is a scalable usage aggregation and metering engine for any CloudFoundry (CF) installations. The paramount goal of the incubation project is to provide a complete turnkey solution that any CF vendor can use to enable their CF environments with usage metering and aggregation in a manner that will scale with number of users, organizations, spaces, and services.

dorma+kaba – One of the world’s leading providers of security and access solutions selects CloudFoundry

by January 26, 2016

Dorma+kaba Group is the latest Cloud Foundry user. They decided to start using Cloud Foundry because Swisscom’s Application Cloud offered them a certified and global industry standard for Platform as a Service.
 
“We are transforming our business model, as we are moving away from the product and focusing more on being a service business. The Swisscom Application Cloud is the means by which to do this.”
Andreas Häberli,
CTO, dorma+kaba Group
 
From the product to the services business.
The challenge: fit for the future with Access-as-a-Service. The dorma+kaba Group is one of the world’s leading providers of security and access solutions. The Group has been a pioneer in the field of digitisation for some years now.

Four Meetups in 15 Days

by December 18, 2015

Last Tuesday I wrapped up a four-city meetup tour which began on December 1st in a joint Docker and Cloud Foundry meetup at CenturyLink’s Minneapolis headquarters and ended at StackExchange in New York City. Bridget Kromhout was able to join me for three of them: Minneapolis, New York City, and Comcast’s headquarters in Philadelphia. I went to Columbus on my own.
We averaged 40 attendees per event. I’m honored to have spoken to 160 people across four cities about the capabilities of Cloud Foundry and how it relates and interacts with containers of several formats.
For this talk I used a local Cloud Foundry instance to do live demos of deploying applications with and without Docker.

The New Cloud Foundry Brand

by November 3, 2015

Yesterday afternoon during CEO Sam Ramji’s opening keynote at Cloud Foundry Summit Berlin (our first in Europe), we unveiled the new brand for Cloud Foundry. It marks an exciting moment in the evolution of what has quickly grown to become the industry standard platform for cloud applications.
 

. @sramji presenting the new #cloudfoundry brand. pic.twitter.com/cRl4OkiZZF
— Casey West (@caseywest) November 2, 2015

 
This has been a collaborative effort among many members of the community. It is simple and clean and built to stand the test of time as our ecosystem grows. It is a visual identity tested globally and designed to work across many types of media and last for years.

Platforms Beat Products, Every Time

by October 8, 2015

Platforms beat products. 10 years ago, that might have not been the popular thinking. However, the latest cloud platforms are beating product. Over at CIO.com today, Bryan Kirschner posted an interesting piece on how platform economics work – and why a product strategy will always lose.
As he puts it: “a successful platform strategy requires upending product strategy assumptions. Products win on features. Platforms win with communities. Value creation must shift from internal optimization to external servicing. Behavior must shift from command-and-control to openness by default.”
He goes on to highlight the three key pillars of a presentation from Cloud Foundry’s CEO, Sam Ramji:
1.

Garden and runC

by July 31, 2015

Today, Julz Friedman (an engineer from IBM and the Anchor for Cloud Foundry’s Garden project) posted an important update from the Garden project team to the cf-dev mailing list about the future of the Garden project’s approach to the Linux container runtime. TL;DR here is that the Garden project will be transitioning from it’s own backend for Linux containers to using runC from the Open Container Initiative.
As he says in his email, the team did an initial prototype as part of this decision (fair warning, that repo is a spike).

News: EMC CTO John Roese Elected Chair of Cloud Foundry Board

by April 9, 2015

Today we announced that EMC’s CTO, John Roese, was eleccted Chair by the Foundation’s Board of Directors. In the role of Chair, John will be responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for the Foundation. You can read more about it — and the importance of John’s background — in this Forbes story by Ben Kepes.

“Cloud Foundry is gaining momentum and the foundation needs to be seen in a credible light.” – Ben Kepes

 
“John’s progressive views on technology development and strong business acumen will serve the Foundation well,” said Cloud Foundry CEO Sam Ramji. “He leads a talented Board of Directors who are committed to making Cloud Foundry a place of practice for continuous innovation.