News: EMC CTO John Roese Elected Chair of Cloud Foundry Board

by April 9, 2015

Today we announced that EMC’s CTO, John Roese, was eleccted Chair by the Foundation’s Board of Directors. In the role of Chair, John will be responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for the Foundation. You can read more about it — and the importance of John’s background — in this Forbes story by Ben Kepes.

“Cloud Foundry is gaining momentum and the foundation needs to be seen in a credible light.” – Ben Kepes

“John’s progressive views on technology development and strong business acumen will serve the Foundation well,” said Cloud Foundry CEO Sam Ramji. “He leads a talented Board of Directors who are committed to making Cloud Foundry a place of practice for continuous innovation.

Cloud Foundry Summit 2015 Agenda is Live!

by March 26, 2015

The much anticipated agenda for Cloud Foundry Summit 2015 is here. And it’s overflowing with user stories, high octane keynotes and deep technical content. This is a program you don’t want to miss. Register today.
The announcement press release is below. You an also check out the schedule and register at the official Cloud Foundry Summit site.

EMC Stages the First Cloud Foundry Dojo

by March 19, 2015

(Earlier this morning, EMC announced the first Cloud Foundry Dojo in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Brian Gallagher, President, Cloud Management Division at EMC, gives us a look inside.) 
Having reached the rank of second-degree black belt in ShukoKai Karate, I’m acutely aware that martial arts excellence requires an all-in commitment by students to master strength, flexibility, discipline and harmony across both body and mind. Like any worthwhile training, students benefit greatly from a teacher, a sensei, to impart experience, skill and wisdom. The same holds true in software and application development. Pupils learn from masters and advance to create new innovations through the art of code writing.

Sending Email from Cloud Foundry Java Applications with SendGrid

by November 25, 2013

The following is a guest blog post by Scott Motte (@scottmotte), Developer Evangelist at SendGrid, a cloud based SMTP email delivery and management service.
A few weeks ago SendGrid released their sendgrid-java helper library. The library goes a step further in sticking with Cloud Foundry’s “it just works” experience and making your life as a developer easier. Previously, you had to write a large amount of boilerplate code using JavaMail. Now, you can send email with just a few lines of code.
How Does It Work?
At your Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface, add SendGrid as a service and bind it your app.
cf create-service sendgrid
cf bind-service

Next, Install the vcapenv library, and install the sendgrid-java library.

Scaling Real-time Apps on Cloud Foundry Using Node.js and RabbitMQ

by January 31, 2013

In the previous blog Scaling Real-time Apps on Cloud Foundry Using Node.js and Redis, we used Redis as a ‘session store’ and also as a ‘pub-sub’ service for chat messages. But in many enterprise grade real-time apps, you may want to use RabbitMQ instead of Redis to do pub-sub because of the reliability and features that comes out-of-the-box in RabbitMQ. This is especially true for financial or Bank apps like Stock Quote apps where it is critical to protect and deliver each-and-every message AND do it as quickly as possible.
So, in this blog, we will start from Scaling Real-time Apps on Cloud Foundry Using Node.js and Redis and simply replace Redis with RabbitMQ pubsub.

Future-proofing Your Apps: Cloud Foundry and Node.js

by June 27, 2012

Most real-world applications we ship to consumers or enterprises are multi-year projects. In the cloud era, newer technologies (programming languages, runtimes, frameworks) are created faster than ever. While most of them fail to get any traction, once in a while a technology becomes popular because it solves a problem or set of problems extremely well.
Now in such an era, if you make a large investment for a multi-year project on a PaaS that only supports one technology and some other technology comes along that happens to solve your problem better, then you are stuck. You have unintentionally become a victim of vendor lock-in. The heart of your problem is that your PaaS, and hence your app, was not future-proofed to begin with.