SAP HANA Service Broker Contributed to the Cloud Foundry Incubator

by December 11, 2013

The quintessential story for platform as a service is that the developer needn’t perform a bunch of administrative functions just to start working on their code. Have a look at the installation instructions for the developer-targeted Spring Trader reference implementation for a pre-PaaS deployment experience. In a PaaS, this lengthy guide is replaced with one command each to provision a database and a messaging service, and then another command that deploys each part of the application with bindings to these services.
Service brokers are what make this provisioning and binding happen with ease, and today we are delighted to report that Cloud Foundry partner, SAP, has open sourced a new Cloud Foundry service broker for their SAP HANA database.

Continuous Deployment and Application Delivery with CloudMunch

by November 20, 2013

The following is a guest post from Rosmi Chandy, Software Developer at CloudMunch, a continuous deployment and application delivery platform.
CloudMunch recently announced the availability of our integration with Cloud Foundry. CloudMunch is a cloud-based solution for continuous integration, testing and release management. It manages the typical DevOps activities for a project, enabling developers to deploy applications to Cloud Foundry powered clouds, such as Pivotal’s PaaS. CloudMunch (1) tracks user repos (e.g., Github) for any updates or changes which would (2) trigger the predefined CloudMunch pipeline. (3) The pipeline validates the code, compiles/builds the app, and if all tests conditions are met (4) automatically deploys app updates to Cloud Foundry.

Introducing the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack

by September 6, 2013

Buildpacks are at the core of the Cloud Foundry architecture and we’ve recently made significant improvements to the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack. As the lead developer of the buildpack, I’d like to give you some insight into the design principles behind it, how to use, configure, and extend it, and what the future holds.
Design Principles
The primary objective of the Java buildpack is to be the easiest way to run a Java application.1 The word easiest can mean a lot of things, but to me it means that a developer can push an application and have an “it just works™” experience. An application developer shouldn’t have to mess about with details like memory settings or configuring the container to work with a bound service.

Installing Cloud Foundry on Vagrant

by June 27, 2013

This is a guest blog post by Altoros, a software development firm specializing in PaaS enablement and integration services around Hadoop and NoSQL.
Cloud Foundry is by default a highly distributed multi-tenant platform that is usually deployed at scale (>40 nodes) on top of existing virtualized infrastructure (e.g., VMware vSphere or vCloud, Amazon AWS or OpenStack). For the novice Cloud Foundry developer, a full scale PaaS deployment isn’t always an affordable choice. To address this issue, the Cloud Foundry team released Micro Cloud Foundry as a virtual machine image that could be run on a laptop. Micro Cloud Foundry behaved much like a production cloud and provided developers a sandbox to play with.

Want to Contribute to Cloud Foundry? Come on in!

by May 16, 2013

Cloud Foundry is an Open Platform-as-a-Service, and an Open Source project. It has attracted phenomenal interest from the community – including partners, companies using the code internally, and those individual developers with a passion for getting involved. You can find the source code on Github. Community contributions are what help to make the platform so extensible. We are always happy when we receive a Github pull request to offer new functionality or fixes! We also appreciate bug reports submitted through Github Issues.
Looking at the Cloud Foundry project as a whole though… where should you start?
As you might imagine, there are a lot of moving parts in a PaaS.