Packaged and Offline Buildpacks

by April 3, 2014

With the recent addition of the cf create-buildpack and cf update-buildpack commands, we’ve been looking into changes to how the Java Buildpack is deployed on Cloud Foundry. There is a move afoot to remove the buildpacks from the DEAs in favor of using those commands (with an automated initial install to preserve user-experience) and an outcome of this was the need to more easily create ‘packaged’ buildpacks. In the process of delivering these packages we also realized that we could also deliver “offline” buildpacks. To understand why “offline” buildpacks are interesting, it helps to understand why the buildpack is designed to look for dependencies on the Internet in the first place.

Monitoring Java Apps with AppDynamics

by February 4, 2014

The following is a guest blog post by Dustin Whittle, Developer Evangelist at AppDynamics.
AppDynamics is an Application Performance Management company that offers solutions to monitor a variety of applications running on public clouds or in private data centers. App Dynamics is excited to support Pivotal’s Cloud Platform by making it easy to monitor Java apps running on Cloud Foundry and Pivotal’s Web Services.
Monitor Apps on Pivotal Web Services
The AppDynamic Java agents are included in the default Java buildpack for Cloud Foundry, so if you have AppDynamics monitoring running, the Cloud Foundry DEA will auto-detect the service and enable the agent in the buildpack.

Sending Email from Cloud Foundry Java Applications with SendGrid

by November 25, 2013

The following is a guest blog post by Scott Motte (@scottmotte), Developer Evangelist at SendGrid, a cloud based SMTP email delivery and management service.
A few weeks ago SendGrid released their sendgrid-java helper library. The library goes a step further in sticking with Cloud Foundry’s “it just works” experience and making your life as a developer easier. Previously, you had to write a large amount of boilerplate code using JavaMail. Now, you can send email with just a few lines of code.
How Does It Work?
At your Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface, add SendGrid as a service and bind it your app.
cf create-service sendgrid
cf bind-service

Next, Install the vcapenv library, and install the sendgrid-java library.

Introducing the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack

by September 6, 2013

Buildpacks are at the core of the Cloud Foundry architecture and we’ve recently made significant improvements to the Cloud Foundry Java Buildpack. As the lead developer of the buildpack, I’d like to give you some insight into the design principles behind it, how to use, configure, and extend it, and what the future holds.
Design Principles
The primary objective of the Java buildpack is to be the easiest way to run a Java application.1 The word easiest can mean a lot of things, but to me it means that a developer can push an application and have an “it just works™” experience. An application developer shouldn’t have to mess about with details like memory settings or configuring the container to work with a bound service.