open source

Platforms Beat Products, Every Time

by October 8, 2015

Platforms beat products. 10 years ago, that might have not been the popular thinking. However, the latest cloud platforms are beating product. Over at today, Bryan Kirschner posted an interesting piece on how platform economics work – and why a product strategy will always lose.
As he puts it: “a successful platform strategy requires upending product strategy assumptions. Products win on features. Platforms win with communities. Value creation must shift from internal optimization to external servicing. Behavior must shift from command-and-control to openness by default.”
He goes on to highlight the three key pillars of a presentation from Cloud Foundry’s CEO, Sam Ramji:

Cloud Foundry Serving Around the Globe

by February 14, 2014

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) is a really large organization with even larger reach – probably much more than most of us realize. Sure, you probably know about the massive genealogy library and databases that they have, but it’s so much more. In my cursory research I found that they have numerous humanitarian programs, benefitting people around the globe with health services, drilling wells for safe water, disaster relief, educational services and more.
Why am I telling you all this? Because, just like in virtually every other industry Software is Eating the World; the mission of the LDS Church is greatly enabled and supported through technological innovation and application.

Announcing Cloud Foundry cf v6

by November 9, 2013

You can find our new Cloud Foundry CLI, written in Go on github.
A complete rewrite, and yes, we changed things
We hadn’t been happy with the Ruby CLI for a while. We had three big problems: it was hard to test drive, it was hard to understand, it was hard to make changes. It was time for a rewrite. We also wanted to stay sensitive to the feedback we had received from the community and incorporate those learnings into the new CLI. This means that the command names changed as did the arguments and output, but retained all the previous functionality for interacting with your cloud and then some.
We decided to aim for a CLI that was easily scriptable so you can use it as part of your deploy scripts.

Cloud Foundry is Open and Pivotal, Part 2

by July 24, 2013

In early March we introduced our vision for the Cloud Foundry Open Platform-as-a-Service project at Pivotal, and laid out a strategy of furthering our broad ecosystem with deep engineering partnerships with external organizations.

“Adding full-time external committers has always been a goal of the team, and we are engaged with several organizations around putting dedicated resources on the extended engineering team”

As of today’s major collaboration announcement with IBM, we can now be explicit about one of the organizations we were already working with in March. Working with IBM and other external organizations over the last several months we have learned more about what it will take to scale our thriving community.

Installing Cloud Foundry on Vagrant

by June 27, 2013

This is a guest blog post by Altoros, a software development firm specializing in PaaS enablement and integration services around Hadoop and NoSQL.
Cloud Foundry is by default a highly distributed multi-tenant platform that is usually deployed at scale (>40 nodes) on top of existing virtualized infrastructure (e.g., VMware vSphere or vCloud, Amazon AWS or OpenStack). For the novice Cloud Foundry developer, a full scale PaaS deployment isn’t always an affordable choice. To address this issue, the Cloud Foundry team released Micro Cloud Foundry as a virtual machine image that could be run on a laptop. Micro Cloud Foundry behaved much like a production cloud and provided developers a sandbox to play with. Adds Hadoop Support for Cloud Foundry

by May 20, 2013

In this guest post, Jake Farrell, CTO for, explains how the major shift in the hosting industry towards platforms for high developer productivity and data-centric applications led them to build their Platform as a Service using Cloud Foundry with Hadoop support.

Test for Cloud Foundry Core Compatibility here.

The hosting industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation due to increasing demand for self-service cloud based capabilities. To greet this shift,, a subsidiary of, is leveraging 19 years of hosting experience, and adopting Cloud Foundry as the foundation for its Platform as a Service (PaaS).

Want to Contribute to Cloud Foundry? Come on in!

by May 16, 2013

Cloud Foundry is an Open Platform-as-a-Service, and an Open Source project. It has attracted phenomenal interest from the community – including partners, companies using the code internally, and those individual developers with a passion for getting involved. You can find the source code on Github. Community contributions are what help to make the platform so extensible. We are always happy when we receive a Github pull request to offer new functionality or fixes! We also appreciate bug reports submitted through Github Issues.
Looking at the Cloud Foundry project as a whole though… where should you start?
As you might imagine, there are a lot of moving parts in a PaaS.

Cloud Foundry and Open PaaS at OSCON

by July 19, 2012

The Cloud Foundry team is at the premier Open Source conference, O’Reilly OSCON this week. What a difference a year makes! This time last year, the Cloud Foundry Open Source project and the idea of an open Platform as a Service (and PaaS generally) was a new concept to many developers. This year, there has been a clear buzz around clouds – particularly open cloud platforms –and sessions on these topics have been very busy.
Cloud Foundry had a number of sessions: Josh Long has been as popular as ever, talking about Spring and Cloud Foundry topics; Raja Rao DV delivered a masterclass in node.js on Cloud Foundry; and I hosted a birds-of-a-feather group to discuss the idea of messaging and integration in the cloud using technologies like RabbitMQ.