services

Altoros Releases a Self-Service Cloud Foundry Training Platform

by December 23, 2016

Altoros, a Cloud Foundry Foundation members, has announced general availability of the first-ever self-service Cloud Foundry training platform. In a user-owned cloud environment, engineers can learn and play with open-source Cloud Foundry first-hand.
Combining online tutorials with real infrastructure experience, the course is offered in basic, intermediate, and advanced versions.

Who may be interested?
The training platform is delivered to cloud-native engineers working with Cloud Foundry as end-users. The three main courses include:

Open-source Cloud Foundry for Operators
Open-source Cloud Foundry for Developers
Open-source Cloud Foundry for DevOps

Members of the Cloud Foundry ecosystem that help enterprises to innovate faster may also find this learning environment useful.

New Runtime Module for Node.js Applications

by August 21, 2012

In the previous blog post, Cloud Foundry Now Supports Auto-Reconfiguration for Node.js Applications, we saw that Node.js applications deployed to CloudFoundry.com can be automatically reconfigured to connect to Cloud Foundry services. However, there may be situations where you want to opt-out of that feature to have finer control over service connections or to overcome its limitations. In those cases, your applications would be required to parse JSON-formatted environment variables to perform that same function. While this is not overly complex given that JSON is trivial to parse with JavaScript, you will be required to understand the environment variable names and their payload schema.

Cloud Foundry Now Supports Auto-Reconfiguration for Node.js Applications

by August 14, 2012

Cloud Foundry has long supported auto-reconfiguration for Spring and Ruby applications. Now we are pleased to add auto-reconfiguration support for Node.js applications as well. Deploying Node.js applications to Cloud Foundry previously required parsing of environmental variables and overwriting server and service connection function calls to use Cloud Foundry specific parameters. This approach was not intuitive to developers who just started to use Cloud Foundry to deploy their applications. They would need to consult the documentation and figure out what port and host they need to connect to. Moreover, if an application uses services, developers would need to configure their applications to use the proper service connection parameters.

Cloud Foundry Integration for Eclipse Now Supports Tunneling to Services

by July 31, 2012

Today we announce a new release of Cloud Foundry Integration for Eclipse which features the ability to open a tunnel to any Cloud Foundry data service. Now Eclipse users can use familiar client applications to directly analyze, manipulate, or port the data contained in their Cloud Foundry applications.
The Cloud Foundry Data Tunneling service can be created from the Services table in the Cloud Foundry Eclipse server editor. The new integration (version 1.1.0)  allows users to create data tunneling (also known as ‘Caldecott‘) from within Eclipse Indigo JEE or SpringSource Tool Suite (STS) version 2.9.0 or higher.
Follow the documented instructions to install the Cloud Foundry Integration for Eclipse.