bosh

Meet the New Container Networking Stack for Cloud Foundry

by November 18, 2016

Introduction
A few months ago, we shared a vision for container networking for Cloud Foundry. Today, we are excited to introduce you to netman-release – the new, pluggable container networking stack for Cloud Foundry.
As stated in the vision, the main problems that the container networking effort aims to solve are:

Security policies within Cloud Foundry are provided through Application Security Groups (ASGs) which require an application restart to apply policy. Simple, CIDR-based rules are too broad to indicate application intent.
All communication between containers must go through the Gorouter. This exposes internal applications by requiring them to have a public route or configuring ASGs to allow all internal communication.

Diego-release for Docker Containers at Scale on OpenPOWER

by November 10, 2016

In our earlier blog posts, we have described how to build and deploy Concourse, BOSH and cf-release on OpenPOWER systems, an alternative processor architecture based on IBM POWER systems. In separate performance experiments, we have run up to 10,000 containers in a single IBM POWER system and run workloads such as IBM WebSphere Liberty in Docker containers with better price performance on IBM POWER systems.
In this post, we are describing how to build and deploy Cloud Foundry with Diego, for running Docker containers, as a BOSH release on OpenStack on OpenPOWER systems. Diego release installation steps with BOSH documented here require OpenPOWER specific binaries to deploy on OpenPOWER. We are providing a base Diego release which contains three OpenPOWER binaries: golang 1.7.

Cloud Foundry: What’s the state of the project?

by October 20, 2016

With thousands of contributors and more than 130 core committers on Cloud Foundry, it can be challenging to keep up with the state of the project. At Cloud Foundry Summit in Frankfurt, Cloud Foundry Foundation VP of Technology Chip Childers provided an up-to-the-minute status report on Cloud Foundry. He kicked off the discussion with the to-be-released incrementally v3 API, moved on to “secret weapon” buildpacks, explained the need to migrate to Diego Runtime and delved into Garden before attacking cf v242’s volume services, container to container networking, route services, “bits” service, isolation segments, Abacus, BOSH “2.0” (“the heart of the Cloud Foundry multi-cloud promise”) and the OpenStack CPI.

Concourse-release for OpenPOWER

by September 19, 2016

In our earlier blogs, we had described how to build and deploy BOSH and how to build and deploy cf-release on OpenPOWER systems, an alternative processor architecture based on IBM POWER systems. In this blog, we will describe how to build and deploy the Concourse continuous integration service as a BOSH release to OpenStack on OpenPOWER systems. Concourse installation steps with BOSH documented here need just OpenPOWER specific releases and resources to deploy on OpenPOWER. We are providing a base Concourse release which contains four resources – git-resource, time-resource, archive-resource and docker-image-resource as Docker images. The list of supported resources and additional custom resource types can be built using Concourse pipelines.

GE Leverages Pivotal Cloud Foundry to Build Predix, First Cloud for Industry

by May 11, 2016

At the 2015 Minds + Machines conference in San Francisco, GE announced that its Predix platform – the first PaaS built specifically for industry – was open for general availability. We chatted with Jeff Barrows, Cloud Platform Engineering Manager at GE Digital, to get his perspective on this transformation initiative. Don’t miss Jeff’s presentation at Cloud Foundry Summit 2016.
Jeff Barrows, Cloud Platform Engineering Manager at GE Digital
How did you get involved in Pivotal Cloud Foundry?
When I first joined GE, we were using a traditional three-tier web application deployment model—I designed Chef-based mechanisms to help developers deploy their Predix-based apps to the cloud using AWS or vSphere.

Cloud Foundry on Azure Preview…The Sequel

by August 21, 2015

Unlike most movie sequels, software tends to get better with each new version. This afternoon, Microsoft announced the sequel to its April premier of Cloud Foundry on Azure. Dubbed Cloud Foundry on Azure Preview 2, this newest Microsoft contribution to the Cloud Foundry ecosystem incorporates months of community feedback and new Cloud Foundry technologies.
With these new updates, customers will be able to deploy a standard Cloud Foundry infrastructure on Azure using Bosh-Init.
You can watch the trailer for Cloud Foundry on Azure Preview 2 below:

For more information, head over to the BOSH Azure CPI github repo.

In the News: Cloud Native, HP + ActiveState and BOSH

by July 31, 2015

A number of great resources to help you on your Cloud Foundry journey hit the intertubes this week. Among them:

A step-by-step guide to using BOSH
A helpful list of ways to get started with Cloud Foundry
An insightful talk about Cloud Foundry, cloud native and the continuous innovation movement given by Cloud Foundry CEO Sam Ramji at OSCON. You can grab Sam’s slides here and watch the video below:

And in case you missed it, Cloud Foundry Foundation members HP and ActiveState created quite the stir this week, too.

Cloud Foundry Advisory Board Meeting – 2015 July

by July 23, 2015

Foundation Update
Chip Childers was on vacation this week, so Chris Ferris from IBM gave an update from the perspective of the Foundation’s Board. There was a Board meeting the week prior that was unfortunately compromised by a NYC stock market shutdown and grounded flights. Due to this they didn’t accomplish every they wanted, but they did talk about the upcoming conferences. There will be a CFP (call for participation) going out soon. Chris said the Foundation is currently getting ready for the OSCON conference for which Cloud Foundry is a silver sponsor. For Cloud Foundry, they are planning two mini CF Summits – one is Europe (potentially Berlin in October) and one in China (potentially in Shanghai in mid-November).

Using AWS spot instances to cut the cost of your BOSH deployments

by May 22, 2014

AWS, Google and Azure are in a price war; and seem committed to matching on-demand prices. That is good, but not the whole story.
The under reported price is that of the AWS spot market; which can be up to 10 x cheaper than on-demand prices.

Instance Type
On-demand / month
Spot / month

m3.medium
$56
$7

m2.xlarge
$200
$14

r3.xlarge
$358
$29

There are only 2 differences between AWS spot and on-demand instances.
1. Spot instances take longer to start (5 min vs 1 min)
2. Spot instances “fail” more frequently; when spot prices move above your bid price your instance gets terminated.
You might think that ( 2 ) would prevent you from using spot to host “always on” services like Cloud Foundry.
However:
1.

Canaries are Great!

by October 17, 2013

First a little background, and then a story. As Matt described here, Cloud Foundry BOSH has a great capability to perform rolling updates automatically to an entire set of servers in a cluster, and there is a defensive aspect to this feature called a “canary” that is at the center of this tale. When a whole lot of servers are going to be upgraded, BOSH will first try to upgrade a small number of them (usually 1), the “canary”, and only if that is successful will the remaining servers in the cluster be upgraded. If the canary upgrade succeeds, then BOSH will parallelize up to a “max in flight” number of remaining server upgrades until all are completed.
And now the story.
For the last few weeks I’ve been pairing on the Cloud Foundry development team here at Pivotal.